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Portal:United States

United States portal logo

Introduction

Flag of the United States of America
Great Seal of the United States of America
Location on the world map
The United States of America is a federal republic of 50 states, a capital district, and a few other territories. It resides mostly in central North America. The U.S. has three land borders, two with Canada and one with Mexico, and is otherwise bounded by the Pacific Ocean, the Bering Sea, the Arctic Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean. Of the 50 states, only Alaska and Hawaii are not contiguous with any other state. The U.S. also has a collection of districts, territories, and possessions around the world. Each state has a high level of local autonomy according to the system of federalism. The United States traces its national origin to the declaration by 13 British colonies in 1776 that they were free and independent states. They were recognized as such by the Treaty of Paris in 1783. Since then, the nation has grown to become a global superpower and exerts a high level of economic, political, military, and cultural influence.
Libertybell alone small.jpg More about… the United States, its history and diversity

Selected article

USS Washington in Puget Sound, 10 September 1945
The North Carolina class was a group of two fast battleships, North Carolina and Washington, built for the United States Navy in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The navy was originally uncertain whether the ships should be fast enough to counter the Japanese Kongō class, which was believed by the United States to be capable of 26 knots (30 mph; 48 km/h), or should sacrifice speed for additional firepower and armor. The Second London Naval Treaty's requirement that all capital ships have a standard displacement of under 35,000 long tons (35,560 metric tons (t)) meant that the desired objectives could not be fully realized within the treaty limits, and the navy considered over fifty designs before one was chosen.

Both North Carolina and Washington saw extensive service during World War II in a variety of roles, primarily in the Pacific theater. North Carolina frequently acted as an escort for the fast carrier task forces, and also conducted shore bombardments. In 1942, during the naval battle of Guadalcanal, Washington heavily damaged the Japanese battleship Kirishima in a chaotic night engagement; Kirishima had to be scuttled the next day. She also served as a carrier escort. In February 1943, she collided with the battleship Indiana and suffered severe damage to her bow. Following repairs, Washington rejoined her sister for the Battle of the Philippine Sea. After the end of the war, both ships took part in Operation Magic Carpet, the withdrawal of American military personnel from overseas deployments. The vessels were laid up in the reserve fleet until the early 1960s, when North Carolina was sold to her home state as a museum ship, and Washington was broken up for scrap.

Did you know?

Water goes over a rocky waterfall, past mossy rocks into a swirling pool.


Selected society biography

Lunney on console during the Apollo 16 mission.
Glynn S. Lunney (born November 27, 1936) is a retired NASA engineer. An employee of NASA since its foundation in 1958, Lunney was a flight director during the Gemini and Apollo programs, and was on duty during historic events such as the Apollo 11 lunar ascent and the pivotal hours of the Apollo 13 crisis. At the end of the Apollo program, he became manager of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, the first collaboration in spaceflight between the United States and the Soviet Union. Later, he served as manager of the Space Shuttle program before leaving NASA in 1985 and later becoming a Vice President of the United Space Alliance.

Lunney was a pivotal figure in America's manned space program from Project Mercury through the coming of the Space Shuttle. He has received numerous awards for his work, including the National Space Trophy, which he was given by the Rotary Club in 2005. Chris Kraft, NASA's first flight director, described Lunney as "a true hero of the space age", saying that he was "one of the outstanding contributors to the exploration of space of the last four decades".

Selected quote

Oscar Wilde
We have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language.

Anniversaries for November 22

President Kennedy before assassination

Selected cuisine

Shrimp gumbo and rice

The cuisine of New Orleans encompasses common dishes and foods in New Orleans, Louisiana. It is perhaps the most distinctively recognized regional cuisine in the United States. Some of the dishes originated in New Orleans, while others are common and popular in the city and surrounding areas, such as the Mississippi River Delta and southern Louisiana. The cuisine of New Orleans is heavily influenced by Creole cuisine, Cajun cuisine, and soul food. Seafood also plays a prominent part in the cuisine. Dishes invented in New Orleans include po' boy and muffuletta sandwiches, oysters Rockefeller and oysters Bienville, pompano en papillote, and bananas Foster, among others. Read more...

Selected image

West Mitten Butte Monument Valley in northeastern Arizona
Credit: Huebi
West Mitten Butte Monument Valley, view northeastward from Arizona to Utah.

Selected location

Top left: Georgetown University; top right: U.S. Capitol; middle: Washington Monument; bottom left: African American Civil War Memorial; bottom right: Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception
Washington, D.C. is the capital of the United States founded on July 16, 1790. The U.S. Constitution allows for the creation of a special district to serve as the permanent national capital. The District is therefore not a part of any U.S. state and is instead directly overseen by the federal government. Within the District, a new capital city was founded in 1791 and named in honor of George Washington.

The centers of all three branches of the U.S. federal government are located in the District, as are many of the nation's monuments and museums. Washington, D.C., is governed by a mayor and a 13-member city council. However, the United States Congress has supreme authority over the city and may overturn local laws. Residents of the District therefore have less self-governance than residents of the states.

Selected culture biography

Jackson at the White House in 1984
Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958 – June 25, 2009) was an American recording artist, dancer, singer-songwriter, musician and philanthropist. Referred to as the King of Pop, Jackson is recognized as the most successful entertainer of all time by Guinness World Records. His contribution to music, dance and fashion, along with a much-publicized personal life, made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades. The eighth child of the Jackson family, he debuted on the professional music scene along with his brothers as a member of The Jackson 5 in the mid-1960s, and began his solo career in 1971.

Aspects of Jackson's personal life, including his changing appearance, personal relationships and behavior, have generated controversy. In 1993, he was accused of child sexual abuse, but the case was settled out of court and no formal charges were brought. In 2005, he was tried and acquitted of further sexual abuse allegations and several other charges after the jury ruled him not guilty on all counts. While preparing for his concert series This Is It, Jackson died on June 25, 2009, after suffering from cardiac arrest. Before his death, Jackson had reportedly been administered drugs such as propofol and lorazepam. The Los Angeles County Coroner declared his death a homicide, and his personal physician pleaded not guilty to charges of involuntary manslaughter. Jackson's death triggered a global outpouring of grief, and as many as one billion people around the world reportedly watched his public memorial service on live television. In March 2010, Sony Music Entertainment signed a US$250 million deal with Jackson's estate to retain distribution rights to his recordings until 2017, and to release seven posthumous albums over the decade following his death.

In the news

Wikinews United States portal
Read and edit Wikinews


Selected panorama

View from near the summit of Mount Ellinor in the Olympic National Forest of Washington. showing Mount Washington, Puget Sound, and various other landmarks.
Credit: Farwestern

View from near the summit of Mount Ellinor in the Olympic National Forest of Washington, showing Mount Washington on the right, Puget Sound on the left, and various other landmarks.

Categories

Featured content

Featured article star.png

As of 22 November 2019, there are 1,222 featured and 3,193 good articles within WikiProject United States scope. This makes up 5.47% of the articles on Wikipedia, 13.34% of all featured articles and lists, and 10.53% of all good articles. Including non-article pages, such as talk pages, redirects, categories, etcetera, there are 1,040,130 pages in the project.
Featured culture biographies: Actors and filmmakersJames Thomas Aubrey, Jr.Kroger BabbEric BanaJoseph BarberaBette DavisKirsten DunstJudy GarlandJake GyllenhaalMaggie GyllenhaalAnthony Michael HallWilliam HannaPhil HartmanEthan HawkeKatie HolmesJanet JacksonMichael JacksonAngelina JolieDiane KeatonMadonna (entertainer)Austin NicholsBrad PittNancy ReaganRonald ReaganAaron SorkinKaDee StricklandSharon TateReese WitherspoonAnna May Wong; Arts and entertainmentJames Robert BakerWilliam D. BoyceStephen CraneH.D.Emily DickinsonGeorge Washington DixonZelda FitzgeraldMargaret FullerWilliam GibsonRufus Wilmot GriswoldErnest HemingwayOliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.Jenna JamesonJames Russell LowellMaster JubaI. M. PeiEdgar Allan PoeRoman VishniacNathaniel Parker Willis; MusiciansAaliyahAlice in ChainsAudioslaveBix BeiderbeckeBig StarMariah CareyDamageplanBob DylanFlea (musician)Black FrancisJohn FruscianteGodsmackThe GreencardsInsane Clown PosseJanet JacksonMichael JacksonBradley JosephMaynard James KeenanFrank KlepackiDavid LoveringMadonna (entertainer)John MayerMetallicaNine Inch NailsNirvana (band)The Notorious B.I.G.Leo OrnsteinEllis PaulPearl JamPixiesElvis PresleySelenaSlayerThe Smashing PumpkinsElliott SmithGwen StefaniThe SupremesTool (band)Uncle TupeloWilcoFrank Zappa; Sports and gamesNick AdenhartShelton BenjaminMoe BergTim DuncanBobby EatonOrval GroveArt HouttemanMagic JohnsonMichael JordanBart KingSandy KoufaxJimmy McAleerBob MeuselStan MusialBen PaschalCM PunkJ. R. RichardJackie RobinsonBill RussellSigi SchmidLee Smith (baseball)Ozzie SmithPaul StastnyJim ThorpeTyrone Wheatley

Featured society biographies: MilitaryDaniel BooneJames BowieSimon Bolivar BucknerHenry Cornelius BurnettFrederick Russell BurnhamWesley ClarkBrian EatonGerald FordWinfield Scott HancockBenjamin HarrisonWilliam Henry HarrisonRutherford B. HayesThomas C. HindmanThomas C. KinkaidEli LillyJohn McCainGeorge B. McClellanFred MoosallySylvanus MorleyEdwin Taylor PollockRonald ReaganUriel SebreeLawrence Sullivan RossIsaac ShelbyWilliam Tecumseh ShermanMyles StandishEdward TellerBenjamin Franklin TilleyStephen TriggHarriet Tubman; Politics and governmentSamuel AdamsJ. C. W. BeckhamDaniel BooneWilliam O'Connell BradleySimon Bolivar BucknerHenry Cornelius BurnettCharles Carroll the SettlerMurray ChotinerWesley ClarkGrover ClevelandCalvin CoolidgeRichard CordrayJohn J. CrittendenGerald FordWendell FordWilliam GoebelEmma GoldmanJohn W. JohnstonFranklin Knight LaneJohn McCainGeorge B. McClellanBob McEwenThomas R. MarshallHarvey MilkEdwin P. MorrowPat NixonBarack ObamaRosa ParksPaul E. PattonEdwin Taylor PollockNancy ReaganRonald ReaganTheodore RooseveltLawrence Sullivan RossTerry SanfordAntonin ScaliaSolomon P. SharpIsaac ShelbyAugustus Owsley StanleyStephen TriggJerry VoorhisDaniel WebsterFranklin D. RooseveltHarry S. Truman; Science and academiaEdward Drinker CopeOliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.David A. JohnstonEli LillyGlynn LunneyBarbara McClintockSylvanus MorleyGerard K. O'NeillHilary PutnamEdward TellerRoman VishniacOtto Julius Zobel

Featured lists: There are over 230 Featured lists in the scope of United States including: 109th United States CongressCommandant of the Marine CorpsKorean War Medal of Honor recipientsMost populous counties in the United StatesNational Parks of the United StatesTallest buildings in Washington, D.C.U.S. state name etymologiesU.S. states by populationUnited States Secretary of EnergyVolcanoes in the Hawaiian – Emperor seamount chain
See more by WikiProject...


Topics

History (, ) TimelinePre-ColumbianColonial United StatesThirteen ColoniesDeclaration of IndependenceAmerican RevolutionWestward ExpansionCivil WarReconstruction EraWorld War IGreat DepressionWorld War IIKorean WarCold WarVietnam WarCivil Rights MovementWar on TerrorismForeign relationsMilitaryDemographicIndustrialInventions and DiscoveriesPostal

Government () Law (ConstitutionBill of RightsSeparation of powers) • Legislative branch (HouseSenate) • Executive Branch (CabinetFederal agencies) • Judicial Branch (Supreme CourtAppeals) • Law enforcement (DoJFBI) • Intelligence (CIADIANSA) • Military (ArmyNavyMarinesAir ForceCoast Guard) • Flag

Politics (outline) Political parties (DemocratsRepublicans) • Elections (Electoral College) • Political ideologyPolitical scandalsRed states and blue statesUncle SamPuerto Rican independence movement

Geography () Political divisionsTerritoryStatesCitiesCountiesRegions (New EnglandMid-AtlanticThe SouthMidwestGreat PlainsNorthwestSouthwest) • Mountains (AppalachianRocky) • Rivers (MississippiColorado) • IslandsExtreme pointsNational Park SystemWater supply and sanitation

Liberty Bell

Economy () U.S. Dollar • Companies • Wall StreetFederal ReserveBankingStandard of living (Personal & Household incomeIncome inequalityHomeownership) • CommunicationsTransportation (CarsTrucksHighwaysAirportsRailroads) • Tourism

Society Demographics (, ) • Languages (American EnglishSpanish) • ReligionSocial class (American DreamAffluenceMiddle classPovertyEducational attainmentProfessional and working class conflict) • MediaEducationHolidaysCrimePrisonsHealth care

Culture () Music (ClassicalFolkPopularJazz) • Film & TV (Hollywood) • Literature (American FolklorePoetryTranscendentalismHarlem RenaissanceBeat generation) • PhilosophyVisual arts • (Abstract expressionism) • CuisineDanceArchitectureFashion

Issues Affirmative actionAmerican exceptionalismAnti-AmericanismCapital punishmentDrug policy & ProhibitionEnvironmentalismHuman rightsImmigrationMexico–United States barrierObesityPornographyRacial profilingSame-sex marriageAbortionAdolescent sexuality

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Total pages in content type is 8

Good article nominees

Total pages in content type is 81


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Other issues

  • Portal:United States - Needs to be updated and expanded
  • 2010 Census - Update articles using 2000 census data to use the 2010 data

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