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A world map of countries by oil exportation, 2006.
Trends in the top five crude oil-exporting countries, 1980–2012
OPEC oil exports and production

This is a list of oil-producing countries by oil exports based on The World Factbook [1] and other Sources.[1] Many countries also import oil, and some import more oil than they export.

Countries by rank

Country/Region Oil exports (bbl/day) Date of information
 Saudi Arabia 6,658,642 2020 est.
 Russia 4,653,500 2020 est.
 Iraq 3,428,379 2020 est.
 United States 3,175,000 2020
 Canada 3,037, 668 2020
 United Arab Emirates 2,418,388 2020
 Kuwait 1,826,331 2020
 Nigeria 1,879,288 2020
 Qatar 502,801 2020
 Angola 1,219,656 2020
 Kazakhstan 1,410,917 2019 est
 Mexico 1,198,511 2020
 Venezuela 486,792 2020
 Norway 1,501,768 2020
 Oman 859,883 2020 est.
 Azerbaijan 813,000 2018 est.
 Algeria 438,700 2020 est.
 Iran 404,489 2020 est.
 Colombia 540,959 2020 est.
 United Kingdom 724,334 2020 est.
 Brazil 832,473 2016 est.
 Ecuador 361,820 2020 est.
 Libya 347,156 2020 est.
 Indonesia 92,909 2020 est.
 Equatorial Guinea 110,186 2019 est.
 Australia 253,157 2020 est.
 South Sudan 291,800 2010 est.
 Congo 282,156 2020 est.
 Malaysia 280,000 2020 est.
 Gabon 196,078 2020 est.
 Vietnam 113,497 2020 est.
 Yemen 8,875 2016 est.
 Denmark 78,070 2016 est.
 Bahrain 154,691 2016 est.
 Syria 6,580 2019 est.
 Brunei 82,333 2020 est.
 Chad 97,079 2016 est.
 Sudan 135,431 2020 est.
 Argentina 90,920 2010 est.
 East Timor 87,000 2010 est.
 Egypt 102,750 2020 est.
 Cuba 83,000 2012 est.
 Tunisia 77,980 2010 est.
 Trinidad and Tobago 75,340 2010 est.
 Turkmenistan 67,000 2012 est.
 Cameroon 55,680 2010 est.
 New Zealand 47,290 2010 est.
 Netherlands 35,500 2013 est.
 China 33,000 2013 est.
 Thailand 32,200 2011 est.
 Ivory Coast 32,190 2010 est.
 Papua New Guinea 28,400 2010 est.
 Albania 23,320 2013 est.
 DR Congo 22,240 2010 est.
 Philippines 20,090 2010 est.
 Greece 0 2021 est.
 Peru 15,610 2012 est.
 Germany 14,260 2010 est.
 Guatemala 10,960 2010 est.
 Estonia 7,624 2010 est.
 Suriname 7,621 2010 est.
 Mauritania 7,337 2010 est.
 Italy 6,300 2010 est.
 Mongolia 5,680 2010 est.
 Belize 4,345 2010 est.
 Poland 3,615 2011 est.
 Lithuania 2,181 2010 est.
 Ireland 1,858 2010 est.
 Barbados 765 2010 est.
 Georgia 531 2012 est.
 Czech Republic 404 2010 est.
 Slovakia 263 2010 est.
 Bolivia 61 2013 est.

Oil export revenues

Academic contributions have written about differences in petroleum revenue management in various countries. Many scholars see the natural resource wealth in some countries as a natural resource blessing, while in others it has been referred to as a natural resource curse.[2] A vast body of resource curse literature has studied the role of governance regimes, legal frameworks and political risk in building an economy based on natural resource exploitation.[3][4][5] However, whether it is seen as a blessing or a curse, the recent political decisions regarding the future of petroleum production in many countries were given an extractivist direction, thus also granting a status quo to the exploitation of natural resources.[6] The PRIX index forecasts the effect of political developments on exports from major petroleum-producing countries.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ "International - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)".
  2. ^ Sachs J. D.; Warner A.M. (2001). "The curse of natural resources" (PDF). European Economic Review. 4 (45). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-05-17. Retrieved 2016-07-13.
  3. ^ Humphreys, M., Sachs, J. and Stiglitz, J. E. (2007). "Escaping the resource curse". European economic review. Cambridge University Press.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  4. ^ Tietenberg, T. H.; Lewis, L. (2000). "Environmental and natural resource economics".
  5. ^ Ross, M. L. (2003). "The natural resource curse: How wealth can make you poor". European Economic Review.
  6. ^ Wilson, E.; Stammler, F. (2015). "Beyond extractivism and alternative cosmologies: Arctic communities and extractive industries in uncertain times". European Economic Review. 3 (1). doi:10.1016/j.exis.2015.12.001.
  7. ^ "Nuclear Negotiations, Restructuring at Chevron and a New Political Risk Index for Oil Markets". Alberta Oil Magazine. 2015-06-29. Archived from the original on 2015-12-20. Retrieved 2015-09-26.